I hate to say I told you so…

I really want to believe Mark’s post as I have nothing but goodwill for Ubuntu (if Ubuntu succeeds, we all succeed) and Mark.  However, I have to say that I think there are at least two points which are overlooked in his post, and I suspect intentionally.

The first is the role that copyright assessment has played in this debate.  It has appeared as one of the top concerns in almost everyone’s feedback, and yet Mark doesn’t even mention it.  I can’t see how this is unintentional.

The second is that concerns about the way in which AppIndicators were being designed were expressed fairly early on.  The one I can put my thumb on directly is this one in 2009 where I express my frustration that Canonical seems to be ghettoizing design discussions for a cross-desktop specification to the Ubuntu Ayatana mailing list.  I hate to say I told you so, but, well… :)  This conversation should have been in upstream from day one.  No wonder GNOME didn’t buy in.  Competition can only be competition if you actually show up at the same table to play.  You can’t call it “competition in GNOME” when in fact it was designed and implemented without any input from GNOME.  That is by definition, competition from outside GNOME.

2 thoughts on “I hate to say I told you so…

  1. “Competition can only be competition if you actually show up at the same table to play. You can’t call it “competition in GNOME” when in fact it was designed and implemented without any input from GNOME. That is by definition, competition from outside GNOME.”

    I’m not sure to know the whole process of including something within Gnome. Can a contributor just say “hey, I have this great idea in which this panel will start a process that eventually will turn on my coffee machine at 5 am and then it will triggers the alarm” and just because it sounds good it will be an official Gnome application?… I think not. Many if not all of the modules/apps/apis distributed under Gnome umbrella were made outside Gnome and then integrated as someone inside Gnome said it was usefull for the project.

    An example of compettition within Gnome is Pidgin vs Empathy neither of them was a project created “inside gnome” but were developed by Gnome developers. Then the gnome team decided that Empathy was better than pidgin and now its an official Gnome app.

    Now let me ask you, how was Ubuntu/Canonical/Mark going to do to get his api accepted by Gnome if it wasn’t by developing them and saying “Hey we have this working, take a look at this feature which is missing inside Gnome, and we can work to get it integrated blah blah blah…”

    Im not a fan of ubuntu, but lately (I mean last year or so) Gnome team’s been a bit biased on what should be a good “Gnome desktop”, of course their idea of it is essentially their own ideas and no body elses

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